Mode of Entry and Gender as Determinants of Nigerian Pre-service Teachers’ Performance in Degree Mathematics and Science Courses

  IJMTT-book-cover
 
International Journal of Mathematical Trends and Technology (IJMTT)          
 
© 2012 by IJMTT Journal
Volume-3 Issue-3                           
Year of Publication : 2012
Authors : Alfred O. Fatade , Love M. Nneji, Adeneye O. A. Awofala , Awoyemi A. Awofala

MLA

Alfred O. Fatade , Love M. Nneji, Adeneye O. A. Awofala , Awoyemi A. Awofala "Mode of Entry and Gender as Determinants of Nigerian Pre-service Teachers’ Performance in Degree Mathematics and Science Courses"International Journal of Mathematical Trends and Technology (IJMTT),V3(3):99-109.June 2012. Published by Seventh Sense Research Group.

Abstract
—This study investigated the effects of mode of entry and gender on pre-service teachers’ performance in degree mathematics and science courses. Data were drawn from students’ (125 males and 121 females) final year results in four disciplines in education (mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology) from a conventional university in Nigeria. Independent samples t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to analyze the data. The results showed that there was a significant effect of mode of entry on pre-service teachers’ performance in degree (a) biology, (b) chemistry, (c) mathematics, and (d) physics in favour of the entrants by direct entry mode. Entrants by direct entry mode consistently showed better performance in degree mathematics and science courses than entrants by pre-degree science education mode and entrants by unified tertiary matriculation examination mode. However, there was no significant effect of gender on pre-service teachers’ performance in degree (a) biology, (b) chemistry, (c) mathematics, and (d) physics. This showed that gender might not be a potent factor in pre-service teachers’ performance in degree mathematics and science courses in the Nigerian universities. It was therefore recommended that equal admission opportunities be given to both male and female prospective entrants into the degree mathematics and science education courses in Nigerian universities. More so, the faculties of education in the Nigerian universities should give priority to the holders of the Nigerian Certificate in Education or its equivalent in their admission policy.

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Keywords
Mode of entry, gender, pre-service teacher, Nigerian, mathematics, science courses, performance.